Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

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Sawyer Prize to Robert KelloggAt the 2014 NASS Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana, Fred Sawyer announced this year’s Sawyer Dialing Award is given to Robert Kellogg, “who, through his constant outreach, his unflagging support of NASS, and his technical ingenuity, as evidenced by his invention of the digital sundial, has helped to usher dialing into the modern age.”

Bob designed and patented a digital sundial based on sunbeam projection, first considered when he was at the US Naval Postgraduate School.  But it took more than a decade for those ideas to gel into a firm technical form and a US Patent.

Bob continues to write “Sundials for Starters”, a regular column for NASS's Compendium. Over the last several years he has organized the joint NASS-Analemma Society outreach at the US Science and Engineering Festival and has brought sundialing to Montgomery County Schools in Maryland for the last 20 years.

Fred Sawyer presented Bob with an award certificate, the traditional cash prize of $200 and a custom made Spectra Sundial by Jim Tallman of Artisan Industrials.

http://www.artisanindustrials.com/world-of-sundials/spectra-sundial-potomac.html

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[CHSI - Harvard Collection]

Appropriate to NASS’ visit, Harvard had just recently completed a new major exhibit entitled “Time and Time Again” offering conference members a unique view on the changes in time keeping and the social impact of timekeeping technology.  On Friday afternoon, NASS members followed the Time Trails through the Harvard campus, locating historical sundials “in the wild” and timepieces in the Semitic, Peabody, and Natural History Museums.

The day was finished by two presentations “Trading in Time: European Pocket Sundials Designed for Colonial Use in American Territories by Sara Schechner and “Portable Sundials in Austrian Museums” by Ilse Fabian.

During Saturday a plethora of sundial talks were presented by NASS members, including “Counting the Sunny Hours” by Roger Bailey to a new “Wandering Gnomon Sundial Designn” by Fred Sawyer.  Bob Kellogg presented the making of an animation illustrating the Ibn al-Shatir sundial proposed for Observatory Park in Virginia for the Analemma Society.  One of the most color presentations was Art Paque’s update on Solargraphy, illustrating the technique of forming daily images of the sun a photographic paper that at the last is digitally scanned and preserved.

Attachments:
Download this file (2013_Conference_BostonCambridge_MA.pdf)2013 Conference BostonCambridge_MA[2013 NASS Annual Conference]822 kB

Read more: 2013 Conference - Boston/Cambridge

NASS_2013_Andre_BouchardAndré Bouchard received the 2013 Sawyer Dialing prize at the Boston NASS Conference “In recognition of two decades of promoting, preserving, extending and  exemplifying the pairimoine of Québecois of dialing and gnomonics.”

During the first 15 years of the CCSQ (la Commission des Cadrans solaires du Québec) André made numerous presentations on gnomonics, adopting objective and descriptive ways in order to highlight the specific elements of particular dials and dialist styles.  Now as editor of The Gnomonist / Le Gnomoniste, André is rediscovering the fundamentals of philosophy through sundials, showing that they merge both in time, place, casting symbolic meaning and beauty within their surrounding.  André illustrated this by discussing the design of the 2008 sundial on the shore of the St. Laurence River at Point aux Outardes Park near Baie-Comeau, where the polar gnomon and its supports simulate bull rushes, augmented by a flight of geese.

Fred Sawyer presented André with an award certificate, the traditional cash prize of $200 and a custom made Spectra Sundial by Jim Tallman of Artisan Industrials.

Read The Seattle Times article of May 14, 2013: http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2020985468_sundialxml.html

nass_news_2013_may_Sullivan_DialIn the May 14, 2013 edition of The Seattle Times University of Washington professor Woody Sullivan was honored as ‘Mr. Sundial’ for his persistence in declaring Seattle as the Sundial Capital of North America. Dr. Sullivan has worked on more than a dozen dials in Seattle, including the large 20x30 foot vertical dial on southwest wall of the Physics and Astronomy building at UW and the elegant 11x17 foot reflection sundial painted on the ceiling of his garage at N 47° 41.232, W 122° 21.562.  A small circular mirror outside the south facing window reflects a spot of light onto the ceiling.

The reflection sundial was a labor of love taking over 3 years to create.  Woody marked over 700 locations on the ceiling that allowed him to draw the local solar time, dates, hours of daylight, solar azimuth and altitude, analemma, and even hours to dawn.  And being a radio astronomer, he marked the transit sidereal time for two radio sources.  The dial was painted with marvelous beauty by a local mural artist, Jim Noonan.  The sundial is very personal to Woody, showing time marks for the date he married to the birthdays of himself, his wife, and two daughters.  The zodiac painted along the ecliptic has a local touch, representing Pisces by a pair of sockeye; Cancer by a Dungeness crab; and Capricorn as a mountain goat. There is even a compass rose.

nass_news_2013_may_UW_dialFred Sawyer, president of the North American Sundial Society (NASS) is quoted by Erik Lacitis, Seattle Times staff reporter, saying “it’s likely true that Sullivan’s garage sundial is one of the best in North America.”  When the NASS visited Seattle for the 2011 annual sundial conference, they visited Woody’s Reflection Dial and a marker was added to it for the date and time of itsofficial dial dedication held on Saturday 22 August 2011. “We toasted the sundial with an appropriate wine, ‘Wehlener Sonnenuhr’ by Joh. Hos. Prum, the fine Mosel Kabinett from the German vineyard with a large vertical sundial.” said Roger Bailey, the society’s secretary.

Among Dr. Sullivan’s accomplishments in the world of sundials began in the early 1990’s when the University of Washington’s Physics and Astronomy Building was being designed.  He suggested a large vertical (southwest declining) sundial.  The dial was completed in 1994 and Woody was hooked. He also helped design sundials used on the Mars exploration rovers Sprit and Opportunity that landed ion the Martian surface in 2004.  A campaign to build sundials all around our world ensued with the motto “Two Worlds One Sun”.  [photos from NASS]

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Some years ago Bob Terwilliger built a Laser Trigon, an instrument that assists in drawing sundial lines on irregular shaped objects. For more about the Laster Trigon, see The Teacher's Corner - Sundial Projects. Here is the story of how he used it to create a bathtub sundial and after some years of service, how the sundial met its end.

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The laser projects a beam of light to draw the lines and curves of a sundial onto any surface. To test the capabilities of his Laser Trigon, Bob decided to build a large combination vertical and horizontal sundial in his Florida home backyard … with some unusual consequences.  Here is his blog, taken from “A Dialist’s Notebook – The Shadow Garden

August 31, 1996 – Planning the Garden Sundial

 The Shadow Garden is an area in my back yard set aside for experiments in building sundials. The dials are transient, and all were made from found objects. Some are being built for fun - others to experiment with a method of construction.

terwilliger_garden_dial_modelInstead of putting a sundial in your garden, why not put a garden in your sundial? I am hoping the result [using the Laser Trigon] will be a fascinating and unpredictable garden of objects, some bearing hour lines, some numerals, some both, many neither. As the sun defines the day, its shadow will wend its way among them, anointing those it chooses with the power to tell time.

The first step is to make a working model. I need to get a feel for the relationship between the position of the gnomon and the west-facing board fence. The model consists of two planar dials, a horizontal dial joined to a direct west vertical dial. These surfaces will not be obvious in the finished dial, as the lines and curves will be located on the objects lying within the dial itself.

The Horizontal Dial is limited by the backyard space, such that only to the hours from10am-2pm will be seen, while the Vertical Dial to be attached to a north-south running fence will display the summer shadows to 8pm.

Next I installed the gnomon, which is made of fencing tubes and associated tee and elbow hardware. I temporarily located hour and half hour indicators on the ground by marking piles of whatever I could find.  The markers show the appropriate local solar time.

The hour line timing for this was done [with a now old] computer program, The Dialist's Companion, written by Fred Sawyer and myself for the North American Sundial Society. [Today a number of sundial calculators are available for your choosing, including:]

Orologi Solari by Gian Casalegnoterwilliger_garden_fence

zw2000 by Fer J. de Vries

Sonnenuhren by Helmut Sonderegger

Sundial Design by Miroslav Brož

A few of the objects I found to show local solar time (along with much pre-existing trash) are shown below the dial gnomon.

October 23, 1996 – Rethinking the Size of the Dial

I have to rethink this dial. If you take a look at the full size photograph, I think you will agree that the scale of the objects I used are too small for the size of the gnomon and the overall garden area.  I am going to have to find larger objects, or settle for a design that uses less shadow receiving surface.

February 21, 1997 - A Hot Tub is Found and Construction Begins

terwilliger_garden_plaintubI may have solved my problem. I found a derelict fiberglass hot tub … a discarded Jacuzzi bathtub… which has a suitable variety of surfaces and angles. Instead of many small objects, why not one big one? Tipped up on an edge, it fits almost perfectly between the posts outlining my desired dial area.

The hot tub has been tilted up facing south. It sat naturally in this position, but I provided further support so that I can walk on it without the tub moving. Drainage is provided by drilling holes in the apparent low points of the tub.

In preparation for realizing my dial, I tested the Laser Trigon on the tub. Sadly, the original laser was not bright enough to properly illuminate the surface. I have now acquired a much brighter laser, which I’m installing in the Trigon. The problem of mounting the Trigon has, in principal at least, been solved.

[Lasers have come a long way since 1997. Today, a number of 3-5mW (Cat-III) lasers are available for moderate cost.  Brighter Cat-IV lasers are available for under $1000]

March 4, 1997 – Drawing the Lines

terwilliger_trigon_photo_laserbeamThe new laser has been installed and it gives a perceptible dot. The mounting also works well, and I’ve already laid out the morning hour lines. I’ve scanned some Polaroid photographs to show the results.  The dial is being built for latitude 25° north, longitude 80° west.  My dial will include a longitude correction for the offset from the Eastern Time Zone at 75° west.

terwilliger_garden_trigonheadI’m using a sturdy tripod with a V rest on top and placed inside the tub as if to support the gnomon. Next, I’ll remove the gnomon and replaced it with the Trigon, which has been mounted on a length of the same tubing used to make the gnomon. The instrument and its tubing will be secured to the gnomon support post and rest on the tripod.  I’m including a photo of the Laser Trigon mounted on the tubing.

The instrument has replaced the gnomon and is positioned so the center of the axes of rotation is at the desired point of the nodus, a point that can be used to project the solstice limits of summer and winter and the mid year equinox line. The nodus point was somewhat arbitrarily chosen, but is close to the actual position of the nodus that will be determined more precisely by its shadow on the upcoming equinox. Another view of the process. Pepín tries his hand at the laser.

We start work at twilight, as the tub is too hot when in direct sunlight. This is our second session. Some of the lines have already been laid out and taped. I am directing the laser, Pepín is marking the position of the dot. The morning lines and three lines for declination are finished. The gnomon is back in place. The winter solstice and the equinox can be seen. The summer solstice is there, but it falls inside the tub. The lines are applied with 3M "Long Mask" masking tape. Hours and half-hours run through the tub. Quarter-hours are marked along the edges.

terwilliger_garden_drawingtublines1terwilliger_garden_drawingtublines2terwilliger_garden_drawingtublines3

Interesting? It works for me.

March 15, 1997 - A minor setback

During a windstorm yesterday, a heavy extension ladder blew down and fell on the gnomon that fortunately had been removed and placed on the ground for safety!  The gnomon was bent and will have to be replaced.

April 3, 1997 – All the lines are finished

I have designed some numerals, which will be cut from vinyl by a signmaker who cuts custom letters with a plotter. The numerals will then be applied directly to the fiberglass. Gaps can be seen in the photo below for the numerals 1, 2, and 3. The time shown on the dial is just before 12:15 (the sharp eye will note - a bit after the equinox). The little numerals at the bottom are temporary.

terwilliger_garden_tub_complete0

Almost Finished

April 17, 1997 – The Finished Dial

After six days without sun, I was finally able to photograph the finished dial.  View from the south. The time is just before 11:45.  The flags are those of the State of Florida and the United States of America.

terwilliger_garden_tub_complete1terwilliger_garden_tub_complete2

This calls for A Party. Click the audio panel below and listen to the Beatles' Here Comes the Sun.

March 20, 1998 - Performance of the Dial During its First Year

terwilliger_trigon_drawing_detailsThe hour lines were consistently accurate during the entire season. The taped lines themselves have faded slightly.

When making the Laser Trigon with my small clockmaker's machinery I encountered some problems laying out and machining the parts of the device necessary to produce the seasonal lines and curves. On the finished dial the winter solstice and equinox were reasonably accurate, the summer solstice less so. A bit of "tweaking" of the position of the nodus brought all the seasonal shadows within a half-inch or so of dead center. The results of the experimental dial were satisfactory, and some improvements to the seasonal adjustments of the Laser Trigon will produce an instrument which will, as advertised, "draw a sundial on a Buick".

   

April 28, 2000 – The End of the Hot Tub Sundial

The dial was completed in April of 1997. After 3 years in the direct sun, the dial has decayed. The masking tape lines have faded and washed away. I made an attempt to put vinyl tape over them, but it would not stick. Weeds have grown up through the drainage holes. Since the dial is in Florida I have filled it with concrete cylinders to prevent it blowing away during a hurricane. (I have always been amused by considering what an interesting UFO the dial would make should it fly away, and what the people who found it might think of it.)  Fortunate for all, it has stayed put.

terwilliger_garden_tub_complete1terwilliger_garden_tub_decayed1

Dial Completed in April 1997                                             Dial in April 2000

Installation and removal of the concrete cylinders during previous hurricane seasons had thrown the dial slightly out of alignment. It had never been secured to a foundation and I have always considered it temporary. The dial has survived three years without experiencing a hurricane, and I felt the odds might be against it surviving another.  In April, 2000 we took the hot tub dial down.

terwilliger_garden_tub_going2terwilliger_garden_tub_going3

Going                                                        Going

terwilliger_garden_tub_gone

--- Gone ---

nass_news_2012_aug_nass_1The North American Sundial Society held its 2012 conference in Asheville NC, August 16-19.  Alice Io Oglesby and Hugh Munro, local hosts and sundial enthusiasts, took NASS members on a sundial tour through Asheville and the rolling hills of western North Carolina to see the vertical dials at Sunny Point Café and the analemmatic dial of the “kitchen garden” at the Biltmore Estate.  In Burnsville, NASS members saw the Quilt Block Sundial, one of over 200 colourful quilt block paintings along the North Carolina Quilt Block Trail. NASS was welcomed by the Mayor of Burnsville and had the Quilt Block sundial explained by Bob Hampton, astronomer designer and Martin Weaver artist. The Quilt Block Sundial in Burnsville was a most impressive example of teamwork and community support. Travelling further, Brian Leonard showed the armillary sundial he fabricated and installed in Marshall, NC.

The NASS conference included exciting talks on a colourful “Parallel Time East West Sundial” presented by new NASS member Peggy Gunnerson and shadow alignments at Toshogu Shrine by Barry Duell of the Tokyo International University.  Frank King talked about a most unusual circular analemmatic dial he designed for the Metropolitana of Naples (an Italian job).  Dr. King was also this year’s recipient of the Sawyer Dialing Prize.  Roger Bailey discussed dials of Mallorca and the “Box of Sapphires”, a compendium designed by Ibn al-Shatir in the 14th century. Fred Sawyer gave a most interesting talk on “Projected Refraction Sundials with Ambigram”, and at the NASS dinner on Saturday, he distributed a special gift to NASS participants: a location specific projected refraction sundial with the ambigram showing “CARPE” on the dial and “DIEM” in the projected shadow.  Other speakers with interesting presentations included Alice Io Oglesby, Bill Gottesman, Dudley Warner and Ken Clark.  Next year’s conference is being planned for Boston.

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Photos shown: (Top) NASS conference participants underneath Bob Hampton's Quilt Block Dial; (Bottom Left) NASS members examine Alice Oglesby and Hugh Munro's vertical dial at Sunny Point Cafe; and (Bottom Right) Bob Hampton's Equatorial Dial made from a bent yardstick.

Read more: 2012 Conference - Asheville

NASS_2012_Frank_KingThe 2012 Sawyer Dialing Prize was awarded to Frank King at the annual NASS Conference in Asheville, North Carolina. 

The award is given “In recognition of his innovative mathematical and astronomical solutions to problems encountered in the modern design of notable sundials.”  Dr. King is Council Chairman of the British Sundial Society, Senior Lecturer of the Computer Laboratory at Cambridge University, and a Fellow of Churchill College where he is Chairman of the Churchill Archives Committee and Praelector.  At Cambridge he also holds the responsibility of the University Bellringer, “one of the University’s most ancient and unusual posts” with the job of keeping the University Clock telling correct time.

He has designed many sundials including the vertical dial with Italian and Babylonian hours for Selwyn College, Cambridge (a new dial for Old Court), the Pembroke College vertical sundial, the noon mark wall analemma at 10 Paternoster Square in London, the unusual near-horizontal gnomon sundial as a memorial dial for Margaret Stanier, the analemmatic dial for Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee (2002) and the circular analemmatic dial for the MetroTransit Authority (Metropolitana) of Naples.

Frank was presented with a cash prize of $200 and a custom made Spectra Sundial by Jim Tallman of Artisan Industrials.

http://www.artisanindustrials.com/world-of-sundials/spectra-sundial-cambridge-cambridgeshire-england.html

Subcategories

  • Sundials for Starters
    Article Count:
    6
  • Conferences
    Article Count:
    23
  • Sawyer Dialing Prize
    Fred Sawyer, in cooperation with the North American Sundial Society, established a continuing yearly award, the Sawyer Dialing Prize to be presented by NASS to an individual for accomplishments in or contributions to dialing and the dialing community.
    Article Count:
    19
  • Terwilliger Sundials
    In these pages is the famous tub sundial created by Robert Terwilliger using his laser trigon to lay out hour lines on a very irregular surface to create a working sundial.
    Article Count:
    1
  • Biographies

    Who are today's sundial artisans?  Here are several bioghraphies of several artisans that show the unique combination of talents in art, engineering, and mathematics.

    Article Count:
    6
  • Sunquest Sundial

    This section is dedicated to Richard Schmoyer who invented the Sunquest sundial.  Please visit http://sunquestsundial.org/ as well.

    Article Count:
    3