Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Towson Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 334
A bronze horizontal dial made inscribed "1715". About 10 inches in diameter with an ornately decorated dial plate. The original gnomon has been removed and a modern garden sundial placed over the original dial face; little of the original face is visible. The dial is on a square stone that sits atop a plane square cut stone pillar.
 
 
Collingwood Ontario Canada Equatorial Dial 333
The 12 inch equatorial dial is made of brass with a thin wire gnomon along the polar axis. The dial is mounted on a stainless steel cube with an engraved Equation of Time correction table on the four sides of the cube. The sundial is dedicated to those age 80 an older who have skied at the Oster Bluff Ski Resort. They remind us that the days of enjoyment continue in the winter of our lives, we celebrate the wisdom and social grace they have shared with us as well as their devotion to the sport of skiing. January 1996
 
 
Morristown New Jersey USA Horizontal Dial 332
12 in diameter horizontal dial with very elaborate engraving on the bronze dial plate. In the center is a 32 point compass rose. Hour lines are corrected for gnomon width. The Equation of Time chart is engraved inside circle of hour lines with Roman numerals, which extend 4Am-8PM. At the south end of the gnomon is engraved 'R Glynne Fecit'. This appears to be a copy of dial by Richard Glynne, an 18th century dialist. Pedestal is a concrete spiral.
 
 
Paramus New Jersey USA Horizontal Dial 331
A ground level horizontal dial constructed from a rim of ten interlocking concrete pieces each 33 inches long. The interior is filled with an irregular concrete pieces whose edges form the hour and half-hour lines. The gnomon is iron, 51 inches from base to tip of style. The gnomon interior has a bronze statuette in the shape of a griffin taken from George Washington's coat of arms. The dial was stolen and replaced in early 1980's.
 
 
Stony Point New York USA Horizontal Dial 330
This bronze dial measures 22 inches in diameter, with the gnomon tip 10 inches above the marble dial plate. Hours are marked by Roman numerals, half hours by tics. Dial stis atop a stone and cement base.
 
 
Kennett Square Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 329
Dating from 1976, this "secret" garden room (once a sundial garden with boxwood parterre) was designed by Thomas Church and is on the western side of the 1908 Square Fountain pool. The ground level horizontal dial is limestone with an iron gnomon. Hour lines identified by Roman numerals; hours divided into minutes. Hour line distribution adjusted for style width. EoT engraved on PM side of dial face. Dial sits atop a large mortared stone base.
 
 
Kennett Square Pennsylvania USA Analemmatic Dial 328
37.2 ft x 23.8 ft. This is probably the world's largest analemmatic, unusually designed to show standard time directly. It took 8 years of daily readings to perfect the sundial, which is accurate to within 2 minutes. Hour markers are bronze Roman numerals. Minute lines inscribed in limestone curbing. The gnomon itself is a moveable pole that is set on an AM or PM daily curve. NASS member P. Kenneth Seidelman was instrumental in correcting this design in 1978.
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Equatorial Dial 327
The dial is a partial cylinder held upright at the proper angle by four ornate pillars. The gnomon is a wire stretched between another pillar at the south edge and the mouth of an eagle mounted on another pillar at the north edge. On the wire is a bead, the shadow of which falls on the cylindrical plate. The cylindrical plate has an analemma for each daylight hour of standard time.' (McDowell) One of three known to be made in this design. Another dial of this design, once in front of the Physical Laboratory at Northwestern University, was placed at a private residence in New Hampshire in 1973, Evanston, IL.
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 326
'Very bad small dial on a beautiful stone pedestal. The engraving on the base states that it was erected in 1908. At some point the dial face went missing. A new dial was installed sometime before 1966. It is doubtful that the existing dial is a replica of the original. The stylistic differences between the design of the pedestal and the design of the new dial which sits atop it are apparent.' (McDowell)
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 325
A 12 inch diameter horizontal bronze dial. A wire is stretched from the dial's center, which is decorated as a cluster of flowers, to the beak of a bird perched on the rim of the dial plate, forming the gnomon at proper angle. The bird is apparently the 'early bird' eating the worm (gnomon). The dial plate itself has hour lines and Roman numerals from 5 am to 7 pm. Dial sits atop a cast concrete post with octagonal top.
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 324
A horizontal dial 36 inches in diameter, made of bronze, sitting on an irregular pentagonal block of granite. Gnomon missing. Calibrated to read local solar time, and has a graph of the Equation of Time to correct readings to standard time.
 
 
Baltimore Maryland USA Horizontal Dial 323
Nice horizontal dial sitting on a 6 x 4 foot stone pedestal. The dial itself is 5 foot in diameter with a 2.5 foot gnomon of open-work bronze. The lines, numerals and lettering of the dial face are so finely done that one cannot tell whether the dial plate was made of cast stone or was carved by an extraordinarily skilled mason. The gnomon, unfortunately, is situated incorrectly on the dial face. The point at which the stile diverges from the dial plate is about five inches south of the correct point where the hour lines converge.
 
 
Schenectady New York USA Sculpture Dial 322
Sundial in the shape of a Crouching Indian
 
 
Rehoboth Beach Delaware USA Horizontal Dial 321
A bronze horizontal dial about 18 inches in diameter. The sundial was designed by Col. W.S. Corkran in 1930 and placed in the Homestead House garden, a 3 1/2 acre site maintained by the Rehoboth Art League since 1938. Col. Corkran died in 1962. The sundial was restored in 1999, set atop a capstan from an old sailing ship. Since 1999 the salt air has continued to deteriorate the plaques and gnomon. The dial face is still quite readable, with Arabic hours from 6am to 6pm delineated in 5 minute intervals. Symbols of the zodiac decorate the dial in a circular arc.
 
 
Wilmington Delaware USA Vertical Dial 320
A round limestone vertical dial about 3 feet in diameter with bronze gnomon. Hours are bronze Roman numerals. No hour lines drawn. The dial is set on the side of a beautiful stone tower. According to a plaque at the tower's base, in 1895 Theodore Leissen recommended a large pavilion and observatory be built on the city's highest hill. At the same time the Water Commission needed a water tower. The plans were merged, resulting in a combine stone water tower 115 feet tall holding half a million gallons and a roofed observatory platform. The dial is on the side of this Rockford Tower.
 
 
Olympia Washington USA Horizontal Dial 319
John W. Elliot, a Seattle master craftsman designed and execute the Territorial Sundial. The 6 foot dial is hand-hammered in brass with a bronze rod gnomon. The dial plate has eight bas-relief panels depicting events in Washington State's history including the discoveries of Captain George Vancouver in 1792, the Medicine Creek Treaty between the US and Puget Sound Native Americans in 1854 and the first railroad to Puget Sound, built in 1883. The dial rests on a large slab of Wilkenson sandstone, the same material used in the nearby State Library, supported by four, one foot nine inch tall piers.
 
 
Galveston Texas USA Equatorial Dial 318
This is an equatorial dial 3 x 4 feet tall, set up for the latitude and longitude of Galveston Texas. Corrections for the Equation of Time are cut as an analemma into the broad gnomon that rotates on a polar rod. The Equatorial time ring has hour lines viewed as standard time or DST at 5 minute intervals. The dial started when one of the Galveston residents constructed a park to honor his grand father. Bill Swann proposed to put a dial in one corner. His friend liked the idea. The park architect wanted the dial to be long lasting and suggested that it be made of galvanized steel. The dial is made out of rolled flat bar with a cross section of 3/4 x 4 inches. The dial itself was patterned after a dial which was located at Swann's college campus- Vanderbilt University. That dial was designed by the late Professor Dillard Jacobs. While Swann did not remember the specifics of that dial, the memory of it set the quest to decipher the suns orbit for this Galveston sundial. The time is displayed from a shadow cast onto a time ring. The "operator" pivots a plate, facing it toward the sun. The inscription on the plate reads "Face bar towards sun-Read time at month's shadow". The plate has a cutout in the shape of the analemma. Where the shadow cast by this cutout falls on the time ring specifies the time. Swann remembers that he "stayed out quite late one night to align the dial to a point in the sky near the north star." The sundial design is identical to the design of dial # 344 on the NASS web page. The metal forming techniques are different. Swann has been in contact with the designer, Peter Swanstrom.
 
 
Sacramento Peak New Mexico USA Armillary Sphere Dial 317
The bronze armillary sphere is 5-foot in diameter. The dial reads time and date from a rod gnomon cast onto an engraved, equatorial band. The dial shows date bands and solar time corrected for longitude (3 min 17s west of the 105 degree meridian). The dial is accurate to about one minute. At the noon hour line is an analemma showing the correction to mean time. The armillary sphere was designed and built by observatory staff members Dr. Don Neidig, Scott Gregory, and Mitchell Davis.
 
 
Washington District of Columbia USA Horizontal Dial 316
A horizontal dial 26 inches in diameter with a 9 inch gnomon. Has hour and half hour lines from 5 am to 7pm with 10 minute marks. Made of chocolate sandstone. South of the gnomon is an engraving of two children walking under a tree. Designed by John Carmichael
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Equatorial Dial 315
An interesting equatorial dial 30 inches in diameter, made of bronze and terrazzo, sitting upon a tapered concrete pedestal cylinder that almost, but not quite, looks like a large flower pot. The dial plate is plainly decorated with a gnomon pole about 1.5 inches in diameter. Sitting at the north end of the pole is a very nice globe of the earth with continents in relief.