Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
Newcastle Maine USA Horizontal Dial 427
A small horizontal dial with an interesting history. In 1997 when the dial was installed, the following is quoted of designer and builder Jim Estey: "We set it by our watches," Jim said, and then glued it down to its stand. That means it cannot be reset when the sun and time changes, but visitors will have to compensate."
 
 
Portland Connecticut USA Horizontal Dial 426
An 18x18 inch square horizontal sundial with ornate engraving. Along the edge are Roman numerals telling the hours. The gnomon is equally ornate. Both dial plate and gnomon are made of brass. Dial sits on a tapered granite pedestal with a square granite cap.
 
 
Nashville Tennessee USA Vertical Dial 425
A 6 x 7 foot vertical dial declining 16.4? east of south sits above the entrance to the Science Building. The dial shows hour lines, declination lines and a noon analemma.
 
 
San Carlos California USA Vertical Dial 424
This vertical dial is approximately 4 foot high by 6 foot long, mounted on the end wall of a house that can be publicly viewed. Dial has hour lines and lines marking the equator and solstice shadow limits. Made of wood and brass.
 
 
Berkeley California USA Statue Dial 423
This is a large granite statue by Richard O'hanlon entitled "Sunstone II" and was designed in collaboration with astronomer David Cudaback. A north-south large polished granite slab has the top cut at the latitude of 38 degrees to sight the North Star. A hole in the stone allows east or west viewing, with limiting angles designed to show the extent of maximum planetary and lunar wandering. An east-west stone crosses the north side of the granite slab, allowing light to pass only at noontime onto a heel stone with marks for Equinox and Solstice. Access by admission to the Hall of Science museum
 
 
Berkeley California USA Horizontal Dial 422
At the edge of the bay is a round horizontal sundial about 10 feet in diameter with a stark triangular gnomon. Both gnomon and dial base are of hammered concrete. The base rises above the ground by about 2 feet where Arabic numbers encircle the dial to tell the hours. The dial face is not quite level, perhaps to help with water runoff.
 
 
San Francisco California USA Vertical Dial 421
Dial is on an outside wall above the entrance to a private residence. The dial was designed by Stan Musilek. The dial back is made out of galvanized steel. Metal rails indicate the hours. Instead of Arabic or Roman numerals, the proper number of steel balls indicate the time of each hour. Overall, the dial is 4 by 6 feet.
 
 
San Francisco California USA Horizontal Dial 420
A small 10-inch cast iron dial from England honors Shakespeare in a garden of the same name. The dial is on a small pedestal in the middle of the courtyard walkway and surrounded by trees. Lovely, but many shadows pass over the dial during the day. The dial plate was made for latitude 54 degrees. The gnomon appears to have been cut down to accommodate the 38 degrees for San Francisco. This "hack" method of correcting a sundial does not give correct time.
 
 
San Francisco California USA Horizontal Dial 419
Hilltop Park was built by the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency in 1987. The Landscape Architect was Michael Painter and Associates. Here is a giant sundial 70 feet in diameter with a bright yellow painted steel gnomon 78 feet long. The dial has a cement base and was designed to be used as the stage for a surrounding amphitheater. Dial shows wear and abuse, with graffiti covering the lower portion of the gnomon. Still, it is awe inspiring.
 
 
San Francisco California USA Stone Sculpture Dial 418
This is a 16 ton granite statue by Richard O'Hanlon entitled "Sunstone I" and was designed in collaboration with astronomer David Cudaback. A small wall of rock with a round inlay of dark stone is supported high upon two tall vertical slabs of granite. At the back is a "heel stone" with marks to show where the sunlight strikes at the Equinox and Solstice.
 
 
San Francisco California USA Horizontal Dial 417
A plain but nicely done brass horizontal dial about 2 feet in diameter mounted on a simple concrete pedestal. The dial is in good condition, but about 50 degrees out of alignment.
 
 
Manchester Vermont USA Vertical Dial 416
A beautiful vertical declining dial, done in white lines and numerals on the side of a red barn. Made of metal and wood, the overall height is about 15 feet. The dial has a clean, modern design using tapered hour lines and simple gnomon. The Arabic numerals for each hour are graded in size to match the size of their hour line, with the largest at noon and the smallest at 8am and 5pm. The Manchester Journal reported that "the sun clock was installed the day before Thanksgiving 1999, with final adjustments being done just as the sun went down."
 
 
Lincoln Nebraska USA Equatorial Dial 415
The Carroll Moore Memorial Dial is an equatorial disk dial built by Cold Spring Granite Co. The granite base weighs 6,270 lbs. and is about 6 ft. in diameter. The granite dial plate weighs 3,420 lbs. and is 5 ft. 8 in. in diameter. The stainless steel 5 inch gnomon rod weighs 200 lbs and is approximately 6 feet long from end to end through the equatorial disk. The dial face has hour marks for all 24 hour hours, placed for symmetrical effect rather than for practical time telling. The hours are rotated slightly to account for longitude so that 12:30 is the nearly vertical hour line. Web site has pictures of dial construction.
 
 
Toronto Ontario Canada Equatorial Dial 414
An equatorial dial with rod gnomon bent into a half analemma. Raised Roman numerals along the equatorial arc from V in morning to VII at night. Gnomon held by semi-circular arc with pleasing proportions that match the equatorial arc.
 
 
Toronto Ontario Canada Armillary Dial 413
Armillary dial about 4 foot in diameter. Gnomon rod appears to be missing. Raised Roman numbers show the hours from V in the morning to VII at night. Equatorial strip is about 6 inches wide.
 
 
Poughkeepsie New York USA Horizontal Dial 412
Small horizontal brass dial, about 12 inches in diameter with classical design. Roman numerals for hours with dots for quarter and half hours. Sits on fluted column about 3 foot high. Beautifully set in the Shakespeare Garden.
 
 
Suffern New York USA Equatorial and Horizontal Dial 411
Robert Adzema has designed a 10-foot tall, 12-foot long combination equatorial and horizontal dial made out of stainless steel. The equatorial dial has a wide arc showing hours from 6am to 6pm. At the noon hour is a 31-inch analemma illuminated by a 1/4-inch nodus in a rod gnomon. The pedestal holding the dial and rod is designed as the gnomon for an even larger horizontal ground level dial that surrounds the equatorial dial. For this horizontal dial, the hour lines are made of half-inch stainless steel bars are embedded in concrete. An inscription tells how to tell the time.
 
 
Palisades New York USA Equatorial Dial 410
An equatorial dial in bronze. Has analemma at the noon hour mark. Lamont-Doherty Sundial Fountain.
 
 
Queens New York USA Vertical Dial 409
A 20 foot high x 15 foot wide x 4 foot deep painted aluminum vertical dial entitled '"Winged Shadows." Has declination lines for the solstices and equinoxes. Declines west. On the back wall of the Main Building. Can be viewed from Woodside Ave. Designed by Robert Adzema in 1987.
 
 
Macedon New York USA Henge Dial 408
A cornfield maze for the summer of 2000 at Long Acre Farms. Theme called "Lost in Time" features a number of sundials. The 400 x 500 foot cornfield maze, called the "largest living sundial", is in the form of a smiling sun with 12 corn hedge "rays" from 8 am to 6 pm that align in azimuth to the hour and half hour for Labor Day, 2000. Within each hedge is a vertical pole holding an "Eye of Kala" (an annulus) 12 feet above the ground that casts a spot of light across a hedge clearing at the appointed time to a sign at ground level. At the center of the maze is a horizontal dial with a 12-foot gnomon. This gnomon forms part of the smiling sun's nose when seen from the air. Just outside the corn hinge is an analemmatic sundial for visitors to tell time before going through the hinge. In the hinge, visitors are given a small altitude card dial that tells Eastern Daylight Time from June - Oct. Admission fee.