Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Selected Sundials of Utah

Click on any photo or city name to get more sundial details and more photos.

 
 
Farmington Utah USA Horizontal Dial 783
A 28 x 20 x 2 inch sandstone horizontal dial with a 1/2-inch thick, hand-tooled copper gnomon. Dial face has Arabic numerals and hour lines corrected for local longitude. Dial was hand carved with carbide chisels and maul but using techniques and natural stone used to create ancient Native American petroglyphs found in the southwest USA. Dial is mounted 2 inches above a sandstone base weighing 400 pounds by brass leveling pins; this mounting makes the dial appear to "float" above the stone base. A "Desert Varnish" finish has been applied to the dial face using a natural process that mimics what naturally happens to exposed sandstone over several thousands of years. The natural color of the stone is exposed by the carving process to create a color contrast as might be seen in a Native American petroglyph. Dial is located in the front yard of a private residence. Viewing can be arranged by contacting the owner by email at theoperativemason@gmail.com
 
 
Farmington Utah USA Horizontal Dial 698
A 20x18 inch sandstone horizontal dial with a 4 inch work-hardened copper gnomon. Dial face has hour lines with Arabic numerals. The hour lines and spiral sun symbol were hand carved using techniques and natural basalt stone tools used to create ancient Native American petroglyphs found in the southwest USA. An ogham character representing the designer's initials is carved in the lower left. Dial is placed on a welded steel pedestal with laser cut images typical of petroglyphs found in Utah. Dial pedestal is welded steel with laser cut images of petroglyphs typical of those in Utah. Dial is located in the back yard of a private residence. Viewing can be arranged by contacting the owner by email at theoperativemason@gmail.com
 
 
Heber City Utah USA Horizontal Dial 531
A 51 x 36 foot horizontal dial with a 21 foot welded silicon bronze gnomon standing 14 feet high. The hour lines are copper inlaid in concrete and the hour markers are 4 inch high bronze Arabic numerals. At solar noon, sunlight passing through a slit in the gnomon illuminates the noon marker with a line of sunlight while prisms on the end of the gnomon project rainbows onto this line of light, making the sculpture a seasonal calendar as well as a way to tell time. Created by sculptor Robert Perless, Sun Dagger functions as a unique celestial observatory to amplify the synergy of man and nature. It also works as a seasonal calendar, celebrating the winter and summer solstices and the vernal and autumnal equinoxes with rainbows crossing the line of sunlight from the gnomon slit and falling on inscribed plaques.
 
 
Heber City Utah USA Equatorial Dial 47
A 10 inch wide, cylindrical-segment equatorial dial 8 inches high, fabricated from a section of large PVC pipe. The dial face is aluminum sheet bonded to the PVC pipe and marked by photochemical engraving with hour lines showing analemmas to correct for EOT; hour lines are corrected for longitude and show both standard and daylight saving Arabic hour numerals. Winter and summer solstices and equinoxes are marked. The gnomon is a pointed brass rod. Instructions for use are included on dial face. The dial is mounted atop a 4x4 inch steel post 30 inches high tiled with travertine and marble. This dial demonstrates accuracy of 2-3 minutes year-round. This dial is located at a private residence. The owner will allow viewing if prearranged by contact through email at kirknorth3@gmail.com
 
 
Salt Lake City Utah USA Azimuth Dial 347
A 24 foot tall azimuth dial in a complex sculpture comprising a light projection gnomon within a 36 foot diameter base with numerous additional shadow-casting structures. The "Asteroid Landed Softly" sundial sculpture was created in 1993 by architect Kazuo Matsubayashi. The sculpture symbolizes the concepts of space and time: space as a large boulder (asteroid) sitting on a square pedestal; and, time as an azimuth sundial that shows the path of the sun through the day and seasons. The gap between the vertical pedestals projects a shaft of light indicating the azimuth angle of the sun. The change in azimuth of the sun is interpreted as "seasonal or unequal time." This is not the usual usage of seasonal and unequal hours that divide any day into 12 equal periods that vary in duration through the year. The azimuth angle is displayed relative to two circles of posts. A sloping analemma tablet and noon marks for the summer solstice show specifics on the yearly orbit of the sun. The azimuth vs. time relationships incorporated into this sundial are not hours by any usual sundial or astronomical conventions. The relationships displayed by this dial vary greatly through the day and the seasons. At the summer solstice, the sunrise-to-sunset day duration is 14:56 hours but the south-centered 90? azimuth window of this sundial sculpture functions for only 2:16 hours. At the winter solstice, the day duration is only 9:59 hours but the azimuth window functions for 6:36 hours, much longer than in summer. The change of azimuth with time is strongly dependent on the altitude of the sun which is related to the solar declination and longitude. For a detailed analysis, pictures and tables of data, see K. Fisher's website: http://members.csolutions.net/fisherka/astronote/observed/ALSSundial/ALSPage.html
 
 
Salt Lake City Utah USA Horizontal Dial 114
Horizontal brass dial with a hexagonal shape, about 8 inches on a side. .Unusually small gnomon, only about 4 inches high. A beehive in relief is pictured at the base of the gnomon, perhaps explaining the hexagonal dial shape. Roman numerals with hour and quarter hour lines. Dial sits on a hexagonal pillar.