Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Selected Sundials of Washington

Click on any photo or city name to get more sundial details and more photos.

 
 
Anacortes Washington USA Vertical Dial 212
4'x8' Marine Plywood & Aluminum Gnomon and struts made of copper plumbing pipe. Refurbished by Threat in 1992.
 
 
Goldendale Washington USA Equatorial Dial 242
A 53-inch semicircular steel equatorial ring, 18-inches wide. The 18-inch rod gnomon is suspended above the dial by two horizontal rods. A small cross-bar in the middle of the gnomon acts as a nodus for telling the date. A mechanical adjustment allows for the equation of time correction. The dial is mounted on a large boulder.
 
 
Maryhill Washington USA Stonehenge Dial 241
180' across Reinforced concrete Duplicate, as nearly as possible original size and design of the original. Outer circle of 30 16' pillars, inner circle 40 pillars 9' high. Build by Sam Hill as a memorial to servicemen of Klickitat Co. Washington who died in WWI. 3 page description in envelope.
 
 
Olympia Washington USA Horizontal Dial 319
John W. Elliot, a Seattle master craftsman designed and execute the Territorial Sundial. The 6 foot dial is hand-hammered in brass with a bronze rod gnomon. The dial plate has eight bas-relief panels depicting events in Washington State's history including the discoveries of Captain George Vancouver in 1792, the Medicine Creek Treaty between the US and Puget Sound Native Americans in 1854 and the first railroad to Puget Sound, built in 1883. The dial rests on a large slab of Wilkenson sandstone, the same material used in the nearby State Library, supported by four, one foot nine inch tall piers.
 
 
Renton Washington USA Horizontal Dial 524
A 44 x 60 foot horizontal dial with 20 foot tall stainless steel gnomon. This may be the largest horizontal dial in the state of Washington. Five colors of concrete define distinct parts of the dial and pathways (the 8 o?clock and 5 o?clock hour lines are walkways between buildings). Other hour lines have concrete benches and stainless steel discs to mark each hour, plus inlaid bronze discs for daylight saving time. Hour lines have inset disks to indicate the hour, one disk for each counted hour 6 AM to 7 PM. The mid-day N-S hour line features thirteen hour disks; the previous hour has 12 disks and the next hour is marked with two disks. The N-S hour line may include one disk that is also a light to illuminate the gnomon at night.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Analemmatic Dial 74
27' Bronze, concrete Viewer becomes the gnomon. As of 1994, structure is unstable and corroded. Badly in need of refurbishing. Press release w/quotes from designer on file.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Vertical Dial 117
Large vertical dial declining 36? west of south with hour lines, analemmal lines, sunrise and sunset limits, solstice lines. Metal structure mounted slightly away from brick building surface. Gnomon is a ball mounted on a rod emanating from sunburst. Visit the university of Washington web page to see this beautiful dial.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Sculpture Dial 306
3x9x4 feet Bronze Gnomon (sculpture)
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Equatorial Dial 315
An interesting equatorial dial 30 inches in diameter, made of bronze and terrazzo, sitting upon a tapered concrete pedestal cylinder that almost, but not quite, looks like a large flower pot. The dial plate is plainly decorated with a gnomon pole about 1.5 inches in diameter. Sitting at the north end of the pole is a very nice globe of the earth with continents in relief.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Horizontal Projection Dial 577
A colored-aperture projection calendrical sundial with one functional and four decorative 18 inch round clear stained glass apertures. Markings on floor indicate positions of projected orange light spot at solar noon from the spring to fall equinox. An additional noon mark indicates opening date of library.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Vertical Dial 744
A 10 x 18 foot vertical dial on a south-facing brick wall. The hour lines are stainless steel sheet and are formed to create shadow effects that change with the position of the sun. The stainless steel Arabic hour numerals are on disks that are held on the wall by magnets, allowing them to be placed for ST or DST. A stylized school emblem is placed at the base of the gnomon. A round, two-sided plaque in the wall below describes the use of the dial.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Vertical Dial 745
A 12 x 30 foot vertical dial on a brick wall that declines 0.5? west of south. The 5 foot stainless steel gnomon tip carries a sheet metal sculpture of an eagle, the school mascot. The hour lines are aluminum strips terminating in Arabic hour numerals. The dial face includes ceramic disks painted by school students and are placed so that the gnomon shadow falls on then on their birthday.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Cylinder Dial 746
A unique, 10 foot tall, 2 foot diameter (base) tapered cylinder dial similar to a traditional shepherd's dial except that the cylinder orientation is fixed and the gnomon is rotated about the dial axis by the user to align with the sun. Time is read from the vertical hour and date lines. The dial is fabricated from bronze plate and is hollow. Lines are formed by individually cut hour and date line segments welded on from inside the cylinder. A lever at hand height is moved to rotate the gnomon to face the sun, providing a vertical shadow. A slit in the gnomon tip provides a more accurate sun spot on the dial face. The cylinder is tapered top to bottom for aesthetics and to minimize the effect of solar altitude variation through the seasons. Ray Monnat, father of two students at the school was the dial project leader, organizing and funding the project. Woody Sullivan, Professor of Astronomy at University of Washington was the designer, assisted by Art Teacher Peggy Dow; Larry Stark designed the turning mechanism. A plaque on the dial base shows the EOT and provides information on the dial. A depiction of the school mascot, a puma, is engraved on the rear of the dial, shown leaping through the orbit of Halley's Comet.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Horizontal Dial 747
A 20 inch diameter cast bronze horizontal dial atop a 30 inch high one-piece stone pedestal. The dial face has cast quarter-hour marks and Roman hour numerals. The dial, built in 1912, has been refurbished and relocated several times and has a new bronze gnomon. Prof. Woody Sullivan and Kurt Kiefer did the last restoration in 2002. Dial times are inaccurate 5-7 minutes. The dial was donated by the University Class of 1912. A nearby plaque shows the coordinates and a table of EOT corrections.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Horizontal Dial 748
A 35 foot diameter horizontal dial of concrete and stainless steel with an 8 foot gnomon. Hour marks and Arabic hour numerals are shown on the inner circle and outer ring. A meridian line has markers for solstices and equinoxes, for cardinal directions and magnetic bearings. The dial was constructed using material obtained from Boeing Surplus.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Vertical Dial 791
A south facing vertical dial on a chamfered triangular pillar. The gnomon is slightly bent. The dial face includes hour lines with Arabic numerals for Pacific Standard Time and PDT, the approximate coordinates and the magnetic declination. The stone pillar includes a direction-indicating weather vane at top and is placed in a half-moon area paved with over 500 bricks engraved with short expressions and the names of area residents, including early settlers. Other areas of the triangular pillar show historic photographic images. The park is placed near the shoreline and affords a view of Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains. Weather Watch Park is technically a Seattle street end. In 1907, the site was a ferry dock for the mosquito fleet. In 1989, local artist Lezlie Jane worked with the Alki Community Council and nearby neighbors to apply for a Neighborhood Matching Fund award to create this art-filled pocket park between 1990 and 1991.
 
 
Seattle Washington USA Vertical Dial 795
A 4 foot wide by 1.5 foot high etched glass plate vertical dial. The gnomon is formed by crossed bars several inches behind the plate and casts its shadow on hour line analemmas. Roman hour numerals for 10 AM to 4 PM are scribed under each analemma; other hours are Arabic. Solstice and equinox lines are scribed across the plate, as are narrow lines at 10 day intervals. Months of the year are scribed about the plate perimeter. A description of the dial is marked on the left side of the plate and the fountains are visible through the plate
 
 
Shoreline Washington USA Analemmatic Dial 796
An 8 foot diameter concrete and pebble analemmatic dial with engraved stainless steel inserts for central date line and simple instructions for use. The dial face is raised one foot on a fluted column above the perimeter concrete and stainless steel walkway and has stainless steel Arabic hour numerals for 6 AM, 12 PM and 6 PM. The walkway has stainless steel inserts showing hour lines, magnetic north, true north, winter solstice, equinox and summer solstice directions. The surrounding stainless steel fence has openings to transmit onto the dial reflected images of the sun setting on the evenings of the solstices and the equinoxes. The dial is located in an open area near the largest parking lot. The sundial is part of Reflex Solaris, an artwork that uses the sun’s yearly positional alignments and reflected solar images to create an aesthetic experience tied to the park’s unique concave landform, dramatic westerly views, and time through the year. Radiating out to the east from the sundial are five stainless steel reflectors built into the land’s upper slopes. Each mirrored reflector has three facets positioned to reflect the setting sun. Each reflector aligns with a significant direction: winter solstice sunset, summer solstice sunset, equinox sunset, true north, and magnetic north. On the solstices and equinoxes the setting sun hits a distant aligned reflector that directs sunlight back to the sundial.
 
 
Soap Lake Washington USA Dial Sculpture Dial 652
A monumental, 1-1/3 life-size bronze, steel and basalt rock sundial sculpture of a human figure with raised arm serving as a gnomon. The sculpture, "Calling the Healing Waters," depicts a young Native American couple as Father Sky and Mother Earth, sacred essence of rain and minerals connecting and bringing healing. Reflecting ethnic and historical themes, the winged warrior protects and comforts the maiden holding a catch basin for the healing waters. The sculpture was commissioned to honor the healing properties of the waters of Soap Lake. The feathered arm of the sculpture falls short of the latitude angle by ten degrees. NASS member Roger Bailey performed a shadow plane analysis based on the actual arm angle of 37° to optimize the design as a sundial. The tip of the feathered arm now serves as the point-in-space gnomon of a horizontal sundial. With the sculpture already cast in bronze and in-place, Roger worked with the project manager to optimally place DST hour markers and hour lines to show the best-possible shadow times mid-morning to late afternoon during the summer months. The optimization effectively shifted the center of the 46-foot hour circle south about six feet. Time is read on the hour lines by the shadow of the feathers at the tip of the curved arm of the figure.
 
 
Stevenson Washington USA Equatorial Dial 707
An approximately four foot diameter equatorial ring dial of natural stone and steel with an analemmic gnomon. Equatorial ring has hour and 15 minute marks with Arabic numeral for PST and PDT. A plaque indicates how to read the shadow of the gnomon, shows primary directions and identifies the dial designer. Plaque includes an analemma showing the equinoxes and solstices and states the dial is accurate within 2 minutes year around. Since the dial includes an analemmic gnomon, no application of EOT correction is needed.