Sundials - World's Oldest Clocks

North American Sundial Society

Sundials of North America

This is a complete listing of sundials in the North American Sundial Society Registry. Click on any dial thumbnail picture or city name to display our complete listing and images. To see sundials in a particular state or province, you may click on the list at left to see all registered sundials in that state, province or country (at bottom) displayed in city order.

 
 
State College Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 913
The John Myers monumental sundial is truly a masterpiece in time. The 11 foot tall black granite gnomon seems to grow out of a larger granite block. Time is marked by the several rows of low, large flat stones, 25 in all. They are set for summer solstice (first row), equinox (second row that has the stones all in a liner), and winter solstice (only for 10am-2pm. The stones themselves are too large for precise time telling, but the use of colored dots painted on the stones allows you to tell exact civil time using the tip of the sundial's shadow on the solstices and equinox.
 
 
Greenville Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 912
This bronze dial is about 14 inches in diameter with a coarse near-white patina. Time is delineated in 5 minute intervals from 4:30am to 5:30pm. The hours are marked in Roman numerals and includes a gnomon gap for a fairly thick gnomon. The dial sits on on square stone pillar and thick plinth. Measurement of the gnomon angle agrees with with latitude engraved on the dial plate of 40° 25' that is more than a degree off the latitude of the the dial site.
 
 
Carnegie Pennsylvania USA Equatorial Dial 911
Anthony Vitale, a life-long steel worker and internationally know metal sculptor, designed a dial for the place he once worked: Carnegie Steel. He started with a flat length of steel 72 inches long, selected the distance between hour lines to be 6 inches, delineated in 15 minute intervals. The result was an equatorial half-ring 45.836 inches in diameter. He added 3 1/4 inches buffer on each side of the equatorial, creating an outer ring 52 inches in diameter. Along the meridian half-ring, the sun's declination is marked with months when a nodus cross bar casts a horizontal shadow at solar noon. The concrete base can unfortunately be rotated and it seems to point to the magnetic north, but bringing a compass or modern cell phone near the steel armillary instantly creates a distortion.
 
 
Sewickley Pennsylvania USA Analemmatic Dial 910
Sewickley is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 12 miles (19 km) west northwest of Pittsburgh along the Ohio River. Riverpark was created in 2010 with a meandering path. At one stop is a plain analemmatic sundial approximately 15 feet across on a gravel bed. Hour markers are granite stones showing 4am-8pm. The analemmatic walkway has engraved abbreviations of the months, looking like granite blocks, but actually clever and beautiful concrete.
 
 
Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA Memorial Sculpture Dial 909
The memorial is positioned and shaped to capture sunlight through its vertical spaces. While the sun travels the horizon, columns of light shine onto the ground, highlighting words engraved in the stone below that express individual and shared experiences about the war.
 
 
Pittsburgh Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 908
This granite memorial octagonal sundial is approximately 5 feet across. The top is unadorned, containing only the delineated hour lines in 15 minute intervals and hour marks in Roman numerals from 5am-7pm. The gnomon has a sharp style
 
 
Chatham Village Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 907
This bronze dial is about 12 inches in diameter. The outside chapter ring is delineated in 15 minute intervals with hours shown in Roman numerals from 4am-8pm. The gnomon has the profile of a bird under the style. An hour glass and wings on the dial face symbolize "Time Flies".
 
 
Meadville Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 906
This patina dial shows lots of wear. Although it sits on an elegant helical pedestal. The dial has a compass rose and from measurements of both the dial and gnomon, it was constructed for London at 51 degrees. This is further supported by the hour extent from 4am to 8pm. The hours are delineated in irregular 5 minute marks with hours shown as Roman numerals. The 6am to 6pm hour lines should be exactly opposite, but are angled toward the gnomon foot. Unfortunately this dial never kept good time in London and certainly can not tell accurate time in Pennsylvania.
 
 
Meadville Pennsylvania USA Horizontal Dial 905
The sun dial was given to the college in 1909 by the Class of '99 as a memorial on their tenth anniversary. It consists of an elegant bronze dial showing time from 6am-6pm delineated in 15 minute increments. Hours are shown in Roman numerals. The gnomon has the number "99" beneath the style. The dial is mounted on a granite pedestal forty inches in height.
 
 
Fairport NY US Analemmatic Dial 904
This analemmatic sundial was created in 2017, 200 years after construction on the Erie Canal began. Artist Vanessa Sheldon "created the sundial [hour marks] using salvaged canal stones [from Erie Canal Lock 58]." According to WHAM News the sundial was unveiled by the Fairport Industrial Development Agency and Fairport Public Art Committee. Funding for the project was partially paid for by a $50,000 matching grant through the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council.
 
 
Los Rios Santo Domingo Distrito Nacional Dominican Republic Compound Dial 903
This highly decorated monument sundial is composed of three sundials (Horizontal, Polar and Equatorial) with a common gnomon. All of the dials are built mainly of limestone. The large polar dial (wings), small horizontal dial (tail) and gnomon (body) recreate a “hummingbird”, the universal symbol for diabetes. (The hospital specializing in diabetes is only 500m away). The dials are delineated in half hours and have a variety of graphics on all three dials. In the same location, albeit separated there is another equatorial clock that is five times smaller and has a custom gnomon in the shape of the "little hummingbird”; this sundial is mounted on top of a column and has been adjusted to the local solar time. Nearby is a plaque with the equation of time.
 
 
Sherman Texas USA Noon Meridian Dial 902
Outside the library are two stone granite guardians about 12 feet tall. They create a noon marker along a low stone wall set along the solar meridian. There are three markers rods set horizontally across the top of the wall that catch the shadow of a horizontal bar set between the two granite pillars. The shadow falls on the farthest horizontal rod on the wall at winter solstice. During the summer solstice, the shadow falls on the nearest rod to the granite block. And on the spring and fall equinox, the shadow falls on the middle rod.
 
 
Pelham Manor New York US Vertical Dial 901
This south facing vertical dial is 4x2 feet made of concrete, now slightly brown with age. The graceful gnomon is white-painted metal. Hour numbers in Roman numerals extend from 6am to 6pm without further delineation.
 
 
Palo Alto California USA Horizontal Dial 900
This horizontal bronze dial is 14.5 inches in diameter, mounted on a fluted pedestal. The gnomon angle is set for the latitude and is 5 5/8 inches tall. Graceful hour lines extend from 5am to 7pm marked by Roman numerals. It is delineated only with half-hour lines. Surrounding the dial face is a zig-zag decoration.
 
 
Santa Cruz Island California USA Vertical Dial 899
This vertical dial has undergone a number of restorations since it was set in lime in 1889. A photograph from 1900 shows the placement of a gnomon rod is horizontal. In 1992 before the National Park Service restoration in 2012 the gnomon is set in a polar orientation. But it doesn't really matter since the hour lines are marked at nearly regular 15 degree intervals with half hour sub-marks.
 
 
Webster Groves Missouri USA Horizontal Dial 898
This horizontal sundial is mounted on a hexagonal graceful concrete pedestal 43 inches high. The top of the pedestal is slightly sloping hexagonal 17 inches on a side. The circular bronze dial at the center is 11 inches in diameter. The hour lines meet a chapter ring with time marked in 15 minute intervals. Roman numerals mark the hours from 6am to 6pm. The 5 1/2 inch gnomon is of badly rusted steel, with iron stains covering the central part of the dial face. The sundial was vandalized at some time in the past and the original gnomon stolen.
 
 
Frankenmuth Michigan USA Vertcal Decliner Dial 897
The dial is elegantly painted on the south wall declining 30 deg west. Dial shows daylight savings time using dark red Roman numerals on a golden ribbon banner. The gnomon is a simple rod held firmly to the wall by an ornate bracket. Above the dial is a large smiling sun surrounded by a sky blue band.
 
 
Frankenmuth Michigan USA Armillary Dial 896
This is a mass produced armillary dial held at the latitude of Frankenmuth by the statute of a boy with raised arm. All this sits on a pedestal with a Greek motif. The meridian circle made of iron is about 2 feet in diameter. The equatorial band is about 3 inches wide with some corrosion present. Inside the equatorial there appears to be an aluminum interior band of Arabic numbers riveted to the equatorial. Hours and half hours are marked by dot bumps in the aluminum. There is an iron latitude ring for decoration. The bronze gnomon extends the meridian circle with both an arrow point and feathered tail.
 
 
Opp Alabama USA Equatorial Dial 895
An equatorial sundial made of diesel engine parts by the students of Lureen B. Wallace Community College, under the guidance of Eddie Spann, instructor for diesel and heavy equipment and designed by the college president, Dr. Herbert Riedel. The stand is a crankshaft from a Cummins engine, while the dial base and dial faceplate are flywheels. The gnomon is a heavy duty diesel cylinder liner puller. The gear teeth on the faceplate mesh with a small gear to allow easy adjustment for the equation of time. Hours are marked by bolts, and on the winter side are painted hour numbers.
 
 
Andalusia Alabama USA Reflective Equatorial Dial 894
This dial is one of Bill Gottesman's uniquely designed Renaissance dials of cast and structural bronze with a 27 inch diameter time telling helix whose axis is aligned to the celestial-north pole. Time is told by a focused beam of light from a long cylindrical unsilvered mirror situated on that N-S axis, reflecting sunlight into a slit of light onto the helix, telling time throughout the day. A sliding time scale within the helix is adjusted for longitude, date's equation of time correction and daylight saving time. Once this scale is adjusted for date, the dial shows civil (local clock) time with an accuracy of under one minute. The dial base is cast bronze that allows adjustment for latitude and is placed on a sandstone plinth.